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Stews & chowders

Scallop Chowder with White Beans and Leeks
Ingredients
White beans stand in for potatoes in this filling chowder, adding fiber and saving time. The flavors taste even better the next day. Recipe may be frozen.
1 1/2 lb Large sea scallops
1 tablespoon Olive oil
3 oz Bacon slices
3 each Leeks, white/green parts, cleaned and sliced 1"
1 teaspoon Minced garlic
1 teaspoon Dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon Celery seeds
1/4 oz Dried whole bay leaves
30 oz White kidney beans, rinsed, drained
24 oz Juice, clam
1/2 cup White wine, dry
3/4 cup Half and half
1 teaspoon Salt
1/2 teaspoon Black pepper, freshly ground
3 tablespoon Chopped fresh parsley
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Scallop Chowder with White Beans and Leeks

Scallop Chowder with White Beans and Leeks

Scallop Chowder with White Beans and Leeks
  • Servings:Serves 6
  • Prep Time:30 minutes
  • Cook Time:30 minutes
directions
1. Remove straps from scallops and set aside.
2. In a large Dutch oven or soup pot set over medium-high heat, warm oil. When hot, add bacon. Cook and stir until crisp, about 1 minute; remove bacon with a slotted spoon to paper towels to drain, leaving fat in pan. While bacon cooks, chop leeks into 1/2-inch pieces.
3. After removing bacon, add leeks, garlic, thyme, celery seeds, and bay leaves to pot; stir, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until leeks just begin to soften, about 3 to 5 minutes. Increase heat to high and add white beans, clam juice, and wine. Cover pot and bring mixture to a boil, about 5 to 7 minutes. Use a wooden spoon to mash some beans against side of pot to thicken chowder. Add half-and-half, scallops, salt, and pepper. Bring chowder to a simmer and reduce heat to medium-high.
4. Cover and cook until scallops are opaque and heated through, about 3 to 5 minutes. Adjust seasoning with additional salt and pepper if necessary. To serve, divide among six bowls and garnish with reserved bacon and parsley, if using. Finished chowder may be refrigerated for two days or frozen for up to two months.
Source: Hannaford fresh Magazine, January - February 2009

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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